ASOtitle

NOVEMBER 2016 SKY EVENTS CALENDAR

The ASO Monthly Calendar of Events and Astronomical Data
Calendar is based on the "Space Calendar" data presented by the
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/calendar/ and the Arkansas Sky Observatories  www.arksky.org Team.
If you would like for us to include your star parties or events, please send details via the CONTACT US button on the home page of ASO.


The Planets for November:
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A VERY poor November for viewing the major planets, with virtually all "wow" planets being in either daylight sky or in strong twilight at dusk or dawn; only the distant planets Uranus, Neptune and Pluto are visible all month in dark skies.  NOTE that an interesting combination of SIX of our planets - Venus, Mars, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto will all be visible in the evening sky just at dusk, with Saturn and Venus setting shortly after dark.

Mercury - Mercury is very close to the sun all month,  it will not be observable  - in SCORPIUS

Venus - our brightest planet will be finally moving into evening skies, visible only a very short while during strong twilight right after sunset; look for the planet low on the SE horizon at mid-month, but moving rapidly eastward throughout the month and evenutally overtaking much dimmer SATURN IN LATE Oct. , and now higher in the sky, increasing its altitude above the western horizon ever so slowly each evening. - in SAGITTARIUS.

Mars - Now just WEST of much brighter VENUS and slowly moving toward the western horizon every successivle night; by late month, the planet will be in evening dusk, setting about 8 p.m. local time.  Telescopically Mars is very disappointing, at onlly 7 arc seconds across - in CAPRICORN

Jupiter - Now rising in the EAST about 3:30 a.m. local time....it will be high enough for telescopic observations by dawn - in VIRGO

Saturn - Very low in western skies at dark and setting quickly after evening twilight disappears. - in OPHIUCHUS

Uranus - distant planet Uranus is overhead about 10 p.m.. local time and is south of overhead by the time the evening sky is dark,  It shines at magnitude 5.9, bright enough to spot in good binoculars if one knows where to look; use a good planetarium sky program or GO TO telescope to locate this distant world; by sunrise it is high in dark skies and will show a faint, blue disk in large telescopes - PISCES

Neptune - Mars is small, but Neptune is about only 1/3 the apparenent diameter this month - look for faint Neptune in large telescopes at midmonth south of overhead about 10 p.m. local time.(mag. 7.6). - in AQUARIUS

Pluto - at magnitude 14.3, our most distant planet (yes....it is a planet) is very low in southwest skies about the time evening twilight darkens; interestingly, it is exactly half way between bright VENUS and reddish MARS.   - in SAGITTARIUS

NOTE:  for locating all of the faint planets I highly recommend a good computer planetarium program or a suitable Sky APP for your smart devices!

Comet Possiblities for November:
There are dozens of observable comets visible every month, in every part of the sky. 
For November 2016 there are NO bright comets, even for modest telescopes, visible.  However that can always change quickly, so check the "Alerts" section of ASO often. 

A moderate-sized telescope and CCD camera can easily record comets down to magnitude 18, of which there will be a good selection every night, provided that you know WHERE in the sky they are.  Thus a good PC planetarium program with your GO TO telescope or to plot visually is essential.  The comets can be updated in yor programs daily by downloading the current data into your database from the Minor Planet Center (MPC) via the link:
http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/Ephemerides/SoftwareEls.html
This will allow access to all visible comets for any given date.

In addition, a listing of "Observable Comets" is availale from MPC from the link:  http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/LastCometObs.html
In the case of a new and exciting/bright comet that may unexpected enter our skies, ALWAYS refer to the ALERTS link on the ASO Home Page.

For the latest observations, magnitudes and physical characteristics of most of the best comets, always look to the ASO Comet Database for accurate information:
  http://arksky.org/comet-data

METEOR SHOWERS for November  2016:

The crisp and cool (sometimes COLD!) night skies of November give way to some of the deepest penetration of earth-based eyes into space, affording thousands of normally not seen stars to glimmer into view; along with this comes a dramatic increase in the visibility of swift and faint meteors that will grace deep Autumn skies; the nights can cool remarkably clear, resulting in some long glances and time spent among the cosmos.  Most of the meteor showers for November are modest, minor streams with few meteors but there are a few great showers each year that peak in November, among them the famous LEONID meteors which may put on a moderately good show on the evening of November 18 and into the morning hours of Nov. 19. 

In addition,  there are MANY other meteor showers which grace our crisp fall nights, some of which are mysterious, some which seem to be vanished from space and others that need observations at every opportunity!

November 5  - TAURID meteors - A good year for this normally exciting meteor shower, since the moon will be a very thin waxing crescent and settnig early.   A very long duration (November 5 -12) meteor shower, that now is defined as having TWO peaks, both seemingly coming from the same radiant at about RA 03h 32m / DEC +22 degrees very close to the Pleiades star cluster; this double clumping is perhaps due to two distinct breakups of the famous Comet Encke at two different times and thus one cloud of debris trails the other by a week.  Look for the "southern Taurid" meteors to be coming from a point somewhat south and earlier (Nov. 5) than the "northern" Taurids which will peak about one week later, at about Nov. 12.  For the peak on Nov. 5, the nearly new moon will not interefere with sighting of  the faintest of these meteors (about 10 per hour and increasingly slightly after midnight); however, the later dates for this meteor shower will see slightly more moonlight and thus fewer fainter meteors during its Nov. 5-12th span.  Note that this shower is well known for producing spectacular fireballs throughout the night and the display can last for many weeks on either side of Nov. 5.


November 9  - CEPHEID meteors - Coming from the constellation of Cepheus, high in northern skies and nearly circumpolar (neither rising nor setting but describing a tight circle around the north celestial pole throughout the night), the Cepheids will peak at a fair time this year, with the first quarter moon will be setting about midnight when the radiant of the Cepheids will be northwest of overhead.  This is a new meteor shower, discovered only in 1969 and needing observations badly.  The year of its discovery over 50 meteors in a 15-minute period were recorded!  So expect to see at least 18 per hour, but only under darkest sky conditions.


November 12 - PEGASID meteors - Like the Cepheids, this radiant is nearly overhead in very early evening for Northern observers in the Americas.  A remnant of an otherwise nearly-forgotten Comet Banplain of 1819, this shower still produces perhaps a dozen or so meteors on a good year....the meteors can be seen as early as late October and continuing until early December.  Look for the radiant at about RA 22h 54m / DEC +10 in the winged horse Pegasus.  This year the moon is almost full this year and thus will interfere with sightings of most meteors; normally it is best to observe this meteor shower after about 10 p.m. when the radiant will have moved into western skies.


November 14 - ANDROMEDID meteors - Like the Pegasid meteors, the light from a very bright November FULL moon will hamper observations of this shower this year;  these meteors can be spectacular fireball meteors, leaving very glowing and distinctly reddish trains in their wakes.  They are debris left from another famous comet, Comet Biela which split into two separate objects in 1845; shortly later, in 1885 the Andromedids put on a fireworks show with over 13,000 per hour seen, most spectacular fireballs.  However shortly after the cloud passed uncomfortably close to mighty Jupiter and since only a very sparse number per hour have been seen.  Nonetheless, like most meteor showers, any year can bring a totally different view of the remnant cloud.  Many of these meteor are so large that they have reached the ground as meteorites.  Shower begins as early as August 31 and lasts until December.  Radiant center is at RA 01h 40m / DEC +44 degrees, not too far from the famous Andromeda galaxy.  Try to observe this shower throughout the evening from perhaps 10 p.m. until about 1-2 a.m. local time and concentrate on the very beautiful fireballs that this shower is famous for.

November 17-18 - LEONID meteors -  An poor year for the normally dependable Leonids:  the moon will be a strong waning gibbous, rising a few hours after sunset and in the sky pretty much all night long, and for days before and after the peak of this year's Leonid shower.  Although the Earth is somewhat posed out of the main clumps of cometary material from Comet 55P/Tuttle, the parent object of this debris, there is always a chance of an encounter with a secondary pocket of debris during any year.  Most meteor scientists are expecting the peak for this year to be slightly before MIDNIGHT on November 17 and perhaps extending into the early morning hours when the radiant will be high in the eastern sky.    In many years hundreds or even thousands of meteors might be seen. This year is predicted to be perhaps a very poor showing in terms of recent years as the Earth passes near the thick debris cloud that produced the famous 1466 meteor "rainstorm" that was recorded over all of Europe.  Meteor forecasters are calling for somewhat of a "strong year" in 2015 with many of the brighter members being seen as well as the many faint meteors on a clear, dark autumn night. 
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SKY EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS FOR NOVEMBER 2016


AUGUST 2016 SKY EVENTS CALENDAR

The ASO Monthly Calendar of Events and Astronomical Data
Calendar is based on the "Space Calendar" data presented by the
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/calendar/ and the Arkansas Sky Observatories  www.arksky.org Team.
If you would like for us to include your star parties or events, please send details via the CONTACT US button on the home page of ASO.

The Planets for August:
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Mercury - Mercury reaches its greatest Eastern Elongation this month, August 16; on Augustt 17 you can spot Mercury easily just a bit closer to the western horizon that brilliant JUPITER which resides just east of Mercury.  This is a very favorable time to spot this elusive planet in relatively dark skies in late dusk twilight  - in LEO

Venus - our brightest planet will not be easy to spot at any time in August, hovering close to the western horizon all month. - in LEO

Mars - Now rapidly increasing its distance from Earth, Mars continues to shrink and be more difficult to view telescopically.   At magnitude -0.4, it is slightly brighter that Saturn, which is just to the left (east) of Mars.  The color differences in the two planets is very easy to discern to the naked eye.  Watch nightly through August as Mars creeps ever-so-closer to Saturn as its relative motion results in a slight nightly east shift.  The Red Planet still has a small disk of about 12 arc seconds and thus is suitable for high resolution imaging - in SCORPIUS

Jupiter - Now sinking closer to the western horizon each evening during twilight, you can cross Jupiter off of your observing lists until Fall when it will reappear in early morning dawn skies - in VIRGO

Saturn - Now setting right about midnight local time, the ringed planet is still going to be an easy target and favorite for star parties and neighborhood outings.  Note that Saturn continues to be only slightly east of brilliant RED Mars, both in the constellation of Scorpius and near the somewhat fainter star Antares.  Note Saturn's yellow color, and compare with that distinct red of Mars - in SCORPIUS

Uranus - distant planet Uranus rises about 11 p.m. local time and is south of overhead by dawn's fist light.  It shines at magnitude 5.9, bright enough to spot in good binoculars if one knows where to look; use a good planetarium sky program or GO TO telescope to locate this distant world; by sunrise it is high in dark skies and will show a faint, blue disk in large telescopes - in PISCES

Neptune - look for faint Neptune in large telescopes at midmonth south of overhead about 2 a.m. local time.(mag. 7.6); it will be quite close to this 73 Lamba Aquarii (mag. 3.7) all month, thereby making it a bit easier to spot this distant world. - in AQUARIUS

Pluto - at magnitude 14.1, our most distant planet (yes....it is a planet) is very low in southern skies, southwest of overhead about 2:30 a.m. local time; only 12 inch and larger telescopes can spot this world visually.  On the 15th, Pluto will be very close to the nearly full moon, but of course considerably fainter - in SAGITTARIUS

NOTE:  for locating all of the faint planets I highly recommend a good computer planetarium program or a suitalbe Sky APP for your smart devices!


Comet Possiblities for August:
There are dozens of observable comets visible every month, in every part of the sky.  A moderate-sized telescope and CCD camera can easily record comets down to magnitude 18, of which there will be a good selection every night, provided that you know WHERE in the sky they are.  Thus a good PC planetarium program with your GO TO telescope or to plot visually is essential.  The comets can be updated in yor programs daily by downloading the current data into your database from the Minor Planet Center (MPC) via the link:
http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/Ephemerides/SoftwareEls.html
This will allow access to all visible comets for any given date.

In addition, a listing of "Observable Comets" is availale from MPC from the link:  http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/LastCometObs.html
In the case of a new and exciting/bright comet that may unexpected enter our skies, ALWAYS refer to the ALERTS link on the ASO Home Page.

For the latest observations, magnitudes and physical characteristics of most of the best comets, always look to the ASO Comet Database for accurate information:
  http://arksky.org/comet-data

METEOR SHOWERS for August  2016:
 
Observe when the moon does not interfere and attempt to observe AFTER midnight for most meteors to be seen!  For August there is, of course, the famous PERSEID METEOR SHOWER, some of which provide for wonderful summer sky shows, provided that the light of the moon does not interfere.  However, as with a months and times during the year, observers should always be aware that new sporadic meteor showers can occur at anytime from seemingly unknown sources and radiants.  Unfortunately for June 2016, the full moon occurs at midmonth, which means that pretty much at least some of these showers are going to be less than impressive in terms of faint meteors.

For a full description of how to observe meteors, how to contribute and what to look for, see the ASO GUIDE at:
http://arksky.org/aso/aso-guides/aso-observational-guides/713-all-about-meteors-the-perseid-meteor-shower

August 12 -
This year's PERSEID meteor shower; what to expect!
Unfortunately this year's Perseid Meteor shower will find a rather large waxing gibbous moon in the sky pretty much all night long (the moon is full on August 17)
The radiant for the Perseids is in the very high northeastern sky and rises well into the night and pretty much opposite the light of the gibbous moon, so some observing might be rewarding; the moon will set about 2 a.m. providing darker skies and fainter meteors to be seen.  Nonetheless, there are dozens of huge brilliant and spectacular fireballs that are typically seen from the Perseids, so these can be see in spite of any lights in the sky.

And YES....there are other meteor showers in August as well:

July 31 - CAPRICORNID METEORS - Actually a two day peak, July 31 and August 1, this is a reliable meteor shower and with this month's NEW MOON falling only days away, this is a very favorable year to experience any meteors from this shower.  Remnants from Comet Honda-Mrkos-Padjusakova, this is an early evening meteor shower; you should prepare to begin observing about the time the sky is completely dark, at the end of twilight, some 2 hours after sunset.   There CAN be as many as 35 meteors per hour from this erratic meteor shower and you should plan to watch until well after midnight.

August 6 - Southern Aquarid Meteors - the thin crescent moon will set shortly after dark, so this also is a very good meteor shower for this month.  Emanating from near the bright star Altair (see article, above!), this is a two-part meteor shower, with this being the first, and the "Northern Aquarid Meteors" being later in the month (August 20-22).  This is a sparse meteor shower but has been known to show off a bit during some years.  Normally expect to see a scant 7-8 meteors per hour during a dark and moonless night from this shower.  The radiant will be favorably placed south of overhead about 11 p.m. local time.  Observations of BOTH the northern and southern phases of this meteor shower are badly needed

August 20 - Kappa Cygnid Meteors - unfortunately not a good year for this seemingly growing meteor shower; both this shower and the Andromedid meteors occur within days of one-another, and the radiant is best placed nearly overhead for northern observers by about 2 a.m.  Although there can be many Kappa Cygnid meteors flying about, they are many times confused with the Perseids which typically have ended by Augustt 15.  The moon is nearly full for this meteor shower this year and will be in the sky all night, positioned unfortunately very near the radiants of both these showers.

August 31 - Andromedid Meteors - In 1885 observers recorded up to 13,000 Andromedid meteors from this radiant in a one hour period (!).  This quite unpredictable meteor shower originates from debris of Biela's Comet and there are years when the Earth appears to pass directly through dense portions of the old comet cloud and some years where no meteors will be seen.  This year, the moon is less than quarter and will not rise until about 2 a.m., so observations should take place early, concentrating overhead, but with feet toward the north east horizon.

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The ASO August Stars of the Month: ALTAIR and the Summer Triangle
Bright Stars ALTAIR, DENEB and VEGA
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Aquila and its bright star ALTAIR are the southernmost of the dominant summer constellations and together with Deneb (Cygnushttp://arksky.org/aso/aso-guides/aso-constellation-guides/72-cygnus ) and Vega (Lyra - http://arksky.org/aso/aso-guides/aso-constellation-guides/74-lyra) (BOTH from Doc Clay's Guides to the Constellations from ASO) form the bright "summer triangle" so unmistakable in our northern skies.
In addition to Aquila in this part of the sky, we find more southerly SCUTUM (the "shield"), a small but remarkably rich constellation often overlooked or mistakenly thought to be part of larger Aquila.  The stray
shield is that beaconing the warrior Hercules, who has lost his protective barrier in the many challenges he faced throughout Earth and sky.

It is through Cygnus and down into Aquila that the brilliant Sagittarius arm of our Milky Way galaxy is seen; when we gaze at this wonder, we are looking across a vast emptiness of space toward a star-and-nebula
rich spiral arm of the galaxy, and the deeper we go toward the rich star clouds of Sagittarius, the closer we peer at the very hub of the incredible Milky Way and its 200 billion so-odd stars. Image that the earth is a
planet on but one isolated star in an OUTER ARM of the galaxy.....as we gaze toward Aquila and Sagittarius, we are looking INWARD toward the nuclear hub of the galaxy of which WE are part.   Looking the
opposite way -toward Orion and Auriga in winter skies, we look in yet another direction and at yet another, less star-dense galactic arm leading OUT OF the spiral system of stars. .
The next closest galaxy that "resembles" our own Milky Way galaxy is nearly 2.5 billion light years distant.  Every star, planet, cluster, comet, asteroid, meteor, globular...that you see is in OUR galaxy; once beyond
all that "stuff" there is NOTHING....barely a molecule, until you reach the confines of the Andromeda Galaxy.  Imagine yet further that - as you enter that galaxy some 2.5 billion years from now as you travel at
"warp one" (the speed of light) - you begin to see new stars, nebulae and all those things similar to that same stuff from our galaxy that you left behind.  Yes, indeed, the "stuff" of which we are made of is all the
same.....universally everywhere.
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Although bordering the star-rich Milky Way and containing many wonderful star fields for low power and slow scanning on a dark night, Aquila is curiously void of spectacular deep sky objects and remarkable
multiple stars that are noted in such great numbers nearby. Even the most famous object nearby is often mistakenly placed within the confines of the large eagle's outstretched wings and talons, but indeed the "Great
Scutum Star Cloud' with its fantastically rich star cluster Messier 11 is nonetheless still in "Scutum" to Aquila's south. .
Note that the CELESTIAL EQUATOR passes through the middle sections of Aquila and just north of tiny Scutum. This is the reading "0" degrees on your properly adjusted declination setting circle. All angles
NORTH of this equatorial line are positive ("+") and all angular measures (declinations) south of the celestial equator are negative ("-"); hence you will see references  to both "+" and "-" declinations for celestial
objects.

Take your summer journey into the Eagle's lair and into the great lost shield of the sky warriors via the bright star "ALTAIR", a nice bright yellow star that is commonly referred to in the "asterism" known as the
SUMMER TRIANGLE, a nice wide shape bounded by the bright summer stars Deneb (Cygnus), Vega (Lyra) and Altair (Aquila). See our constellation "GO TO" TOUR for Cygnus for a sky chart showing this spectacular summer marker!
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IMPORTANT DAILY SKY AND SCIENCE EVENTS

**Aug 01 - Alpha Capricornids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 01 - Comet 73P-AF/Schwassmann-Wachmann Closest Approach To Earth (0.277 AU)
Aug 01 - Comet 311P/PANSTARRS Closest Approach To Earth (1.267 AU)
Aug 01 - Comet 59P/Kearns-Kwee At Opposition (4.085 AU)
Aug 01 - Asteroid 1373 Cincinnati Closest Approach To Earth (2.142 AU)
Aug 01 - 45th Anniversary (1971), Apollo 15 Astronauts Find Genesis Rock on Moon
Aug 01 - 105th Anniversary (1911), 1st American Woman Receives Pilot's License (Harriet Quimby)
Aug 01-03 - 2016 Astronomy Teaching Summit Conference, San Francisco, California
Aug 01-03 - World Congress on GIS and Remote Sensing, New Orleans, Louisana
Aug 01-04 - Conference: The Diversity of Planetary Atmospheres (IV), Squamish, Canada
AUGUST 02 - NEW MOON  - 03:45 CDT
Aug 02 - Cassini, Orbital Trim Maneuver #456 (OTM-456)
Aug 02 - Comet 9P/Tempel Perihelion (1.542 AU)
Aug 02 - Amor Asteroid 433 Eros Occults HIP 110426 (9.0 Magnitude Star)
Aug 02 - Apollo Asteroid 3103 Eger Closest Approach To Earth (0.189 AU)
Aug 02 - Asteroid 4446 Carolyn Closest Approach To Earth (1.866 AU)
Aug 02 - Asteroid 8623 Johnnygalecki Closest Approach To Earth (2.314 AU)
Aug 02 - 25th Anniversary (1991), STS-43 Launch (Space Shuttle Atlantis, TDRS)
Aug 02 - 45th Anniversary (1971), Havero Meteorite Fall (Hit Farm Building in Finland)
Aug 03 - Comet 229P/Gibbs At Opposition (2.092 AU)
Aug 03 - Amor Asteroid 2005 OH3 Near-Earth Flyby (0.015 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 8621 Jimparsons Closest Approach To Earth (1.641 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 20 Massalia Closest Approach To Earth (1.690 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 1288 Santa Closest Approach To Earth (1.730 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 3524 Schulz Closest Approach To Earth (1.938 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 8489 Boulder Closest Approach To Earth (1.981 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 3975 Verdi Closest Approach To Earth (2.004 AU)
Aug 03 - Kuiper Belt Object 2008 OG19 At Opposition (37.613 AU)
Aug 03 - 420th Anniversary (1596), David Fabricius' Discovery of the First Perioidic Variable Star (Mira)
Aug 03-05 - IF-YITP GR+HEP+Cosmo International Symposium VI, Phitosanulok, Thailand
*Aug 03-07 - Saskatchewan Summer Star Party 2016, Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Aug 03-10 - 38th International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP 2016), Chicago, Illinois
Aug 04 - GSSAP-3/GSSAP-4 (AFSPC 6) Delta 4 Launch
Aug 04 - Moon Occults Mercury
Aug 04 - Comet 40P/Vaisala At Opposition (4.059 AU)
Aug 04 - Asteroid 207563 Toscana Closest Approach To Earth (1.722 AU)
Aug 04 - Asteroid 3154 Grant Closest Approach To Earth (2.099 AU)
Aug 04-07 - 2nd American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Conference on Experimental Microbial Evolution, Washington DC
Aug 05 - Asteroid 15845 Bambi Closest Approach To Earth (1.157 AU)
Aug 05 - Asteroid 32605 Lucy Closest Approach To Earth (1.588 AU)
Aug 05 - Asteroid 18610 Arthurdent Closest Approach To Earth (1.962 AU)
Aug 05 - Centaur Object 37117 Narcissus At Opposition (5.228 AU)
Aug 05 - 5th Anniversary (2011), Juno Atlas 5 Launch (Jupiter Orbiter)
*Aug 05-06 - Butter Pot Star Party, Butter Pot Provincial Park, Canada
**Aug 06 - Southern Iota Aquarids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 06 - Moon Occults Jupiter
Aug 06 - Asteroid 10792 Ecuador Closest Approach To Earth (1.787 AU)
Aug 06 - Asteroid 2398 Jilin Closest Approach To Earth (1.823 AU)
Aug 06 - Asteroid 5661 Hildebrand Closest Approach To Earth (2.026 AU)
Aug 06 - 15th Anniversary (2001), Galileo, Io 31 Flyby
Aug 06 - 55th Anniversary (1961), Vostok 2 Launch (Gherman Titov - 2nd Man in Space)
Aug 06 - William Wollaston's 250th Birthday (1766)
Aug 06 - 835th Anniversary (1181), Discovery of Supernova Cassiopeia
Aug 06-11 - Small Satellite Conference, Logan, Utah
Aug 07 - Cassini, Orbital Trim Maneuver #457 (OTM-457)
Aug 07 - Comet 53P/Van Biesbroeck At Opposition (1.544 AU)
Aug 07 - Comet C/2014 R3 (PANSTARRS) Perihelion (7.276 AU)
Aug 07 - Asteroid 6223 Dahl Closest Approach To Earth (1.522 AU)
Aug 07 - 20th Anniversary (1996), Announcement of Possible Microfossils Found in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite
Aug 07 - 40th Anniversary (1976), Viking 2, Mars Orbit Insertion
Aug 07-12 - 79th Annual Meeting of The Meteoritical Society, Berlin, Germany
Aug 07-13 - Conference: Blowing in the Wind, Quy Nhon, Vietnam
Aug 08 - Comet 5D/Brorsen At Opposition (3.283 AU)
Aug 08 - Apollo Asteroid 2016 CL264 Near-Earth Flyby (0.058 AU)
Aug 08 - Asteroid 1002 Olbersia Closest Approach To Earth (1.382 AU)
Aug 08 - Asteroid 30440 Larry Closest Approach To Earth (1.748 AU)
Aug 08 - 15th Anniversary (2001), Genesis Launch (Solar Particle Sample Return)
Aug 09 - Comet 298P/Christensen At Opposition (3.843 AU)
Aug 09 - Atira Asteroid 418265 (2008 EA32) Closest Approach To Earth (0.599 AU)
Aug 09 - Asteroid 64070 NEAT Closest Approach To Earth (1.336 AU)
Aug 09 - Asteroid 5392 Parker Closest Approach To Earth (2.211 AU)
Aug 09 - Lecture: Frontiers in Artifact SETI - Waste Heat, Alien Megastructures & Tabbys Star, Mountain View, California
Aug 09 - 40th Anniversary (1976), Luna 24 Launch (USSR Moon Sample Return)
Aug 09-13 - Conference: Supernovae Through the Ages - Understanding the Past to Prepare for the Future, Hanga Roa, Easter Island, Chile
AUGUST 10 - FIRST QUARTER MOON - 01:21 p.m. CDT
Aug 10 - Cassini, Titan Flyby
Aug 10 - 50th Anniversary (1966), Lunar Orbiter 1 Launch
Aug 10 - Apollo Asteroid 306367 Nut Closest Approach To Earth (1.658 AU)
Aug 10 - 15th Anniversary (2001), STS-105 Launch (Space Shuttle Discovery, International Space Station)
Aug 11 - Comet P/2015 K5 (PANSTARRS) At Opposition (3.214 AU)
Aug 11 - Asteroid 54439 Topeka Closest Approach To Earth (1.360 AU)
Aug 11 - Asteroid 3001 Michelangelo Closest Approach To Earth (1.414 AU)
Aug 11 - Lecture: The Rosetta Mission - Comet C-G up Close, Pasadena, California
Aug 11 - 40th Anniversary (1976), Acapulco Meteorite Fall in Mexico
**Aug 12 - Perseids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 12 - Asteroid 2985 Shakespeare Closest Approach To Earth (1.709 AU)
Aug 12 - Asteroid 1816 Liberia Closest Approach To Earth (1.845 AU)
Aug 12 - Asteroid 3297 Hong Kong Closest Approach To Earth (1.996 AU)
Aug 12 - Asteroid 294727 Dennisritchie Closest Approach To Earth (2.717 AU)
Aug 12 - Lecture: The Rosetta Mission - Comet C-G up Close, Pasadena, California
Aug 13 - Comet P/2013 EW90 (Tenagra) At Opposition (3.916 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 9879 Mammuthus Closest Approach To Earth (0.812 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 76272 De Jong Closest Approach To Earth (1.938 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 5450 Sokrates Closest Approach To Earth (2.065 AU)
Aug 13 - Centaur Object 2015 JH1 At Opposition (3.115 AU)
Aug 14 - Comet 73P-AW/Schwassmann-Wachmann Closest Approach To Earth (0.417 AU)
Aug 14 - Comet C/2012 LP26 (Palomar) Closest Approach To Earth (5.972 AU)
Aug 14 - Asteroid 6775 Giorgini Closest Approach To Earth (1.287 AU)
Aug 14 - Asteroid 3263 Bligh Closest Approach To Earth (1.507 AU)
Aug 14 - Asteroid 10957 Alps Closest Approach To Earth (1.915 AU)
Aug 14 - Asteroid 17627 Humptydumpty Closest Approach To Earth (2.512 AU)
Aug 15 - Asteroid 5515 Naderi Closest Approach To Earth (1.756 AU)
Aug 15 - 65th Anniversary (1951), Dogs Mishka & Chizhik Launched Into Space
Aug 15-19 - 9th Meeting on Cosmic Dust, Sendai, Japan
Aug 15-19 - 5th Annual MESA Summer School, Santa Barbara, California
**Aug 16 - Mercury At Its Greatest Eastern Elongation (27 Degrees)
Aug 16 - Comet 229P/Gibbs Closest Approach To Earth (2.071 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 87 Sylvia (2 Moons) Occults TYC 6817-01360-1 (12.3 Magnitude Star)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 1631 Kopff Closest Approach To Earth (0.765 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 4356 Marathon Closest Approach To Earth (1.480 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 26858 Misterrogers Closest Approach To Earth (1.871 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 227 Philosophia Closest Approach To Earth (2.106 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 2228 Soyuz-Apollo Closest Approach To Earth (2.197 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 5335 Damocles (Burnt Out Comet) At Opposition (20.102 AU)
Aug 16 - 55th Anniversary (1961), Explorer 12 Launch
Aug 16-19 - Meeting: Stars on the Run - Run-away and Hyper-velocity Stars, Bamberg, Germany
Aug 17 - 50th Anniversary (1966), Pioneer 7 Launch
Aug 17 - Comet 225P/LINEAR Perihelion (1.325 AU)
Aug 17 - Comet C/2015 M3 (PANSTARRS) At Opposition (3.719 AU)
Aug 17 - Comet 60P/Tsuchinshan At Opposition (4.040 AU)
Aug 17 - Asteroid 9619 Terrygilliam Closest Approach To Earth (0.796 AU)
Aug 17 - Asteroid 2322 Kitt Peak Closest Approach To Earth (1.235 AU)
Aug 17 - Asteroid 8749 Beatles Closest Approach To Earth (1.439 AU)
Aug 17 - Asteroid 8625 Simonhelberg Closest Approach To Earth (1.478 AU)
Aug 17 - Asteroid 46977 Krakow Closest Approach To Earth (2.036 AU)
Aug 17 - Pierre de Fermat's 415th Birthday (1601)
Aug 17-19 - Conference: Chandra Science for the Next Decade, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Aug 17-20 - Inward Bound - Conference on Black Holes and Emergent Spacetime, Nordita, Stockholm
AUGUST 18 - FULL MOON - 04:27 a.m. CDT
Aug 18 - Comet 299P/Catalina-PANSTARRS At Opposition (3.035 AU)
Aug 18 - Comet P/1998 VS24 (LINEAR) At Opposition (3.071 AU)
Aug 18 - Asteroid 100000 Astronautica Closest Approach To Earth (0.907 AU)
Aug 19 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Titan
Aug 19 - Moon Occults Neptune
Aug 19 - Asteroid 6000 United Nations Closest Approach To Earth (1.268 AU)
Aug 19 - Asteroid 2039 Payne-Gaposchkin Closest Approach To Earth (2.584 AU)
Aug 19 - Orville Wright's 145th Birthday (1871)
Aug 19 - John Flamsteed's 370th Birthday (1646)
Aug 19-26 - 3rd Astrophysical Nuclear Reaction Network School, Schmitten, Germany
Aug 20 - Comet 43P/Wolf-Harrington Perihelion (1.358 AU)
Aug 20 - Asteroid 164 Eva Occults HIP 64792 (5.3 Magnitude Star)
Aug 20 - Amor Asteroid 2014 RW22 Near-Earth Flyby (0.056 AU)
Aug 20 - Apollo Asteroid 54509 YORP Closest Approach To Earth (0.596 AU)
Aug 20 - Apollo Asteroid 1863 Antinous Closest Approach To Earth (0.767 AU)
Aug 21 - Comet 255P/Levy At Opposition (1.919 AU)
Aug 21 - Comet C/2015 W1 (Gibbs) Closest Approach To Earth (2.769 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 2 Pallas At Opposition (8.7 Magnitude)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 295565 Hannover Closest Approach To Earth (1.248 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 10379 Lake Placid Closest Approach To Earth (2.560 AU)
Aug 21 - Apollo Asteroid 4197 Morpheus Closest Approach To Earth (2.841 AU)
Aug 21-Sep 08 - 38th International School for Young Astronomers (ISYAs), Tehran, Iran
Aug 22 - Comet 333P/LINEAR Closest Approach To Earth (1.482 AU)
Aug 22 - Comet 33P/Daniel Perihelion (2.160 AU)
Aug 22 - Comet C/2012 LP26 (Palomar) At Opposition (5.982 AU)
Aug 22 - Apollo Asteroid 3361 Orpheus Closest Approach To Earth (1.647 AU)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 30826 Coulomb Closest Approach To Earth (1.751 AU)
Aug 23 - Comet 18D/Perrine-Mrkos Closest Approach To Earth (1.563 AU)
Aug 23 - Comet P/2015 F1 (PANSTARRS) Closest Approach To Earth (2.602 AU)
Aug 23 - 50th Anniversary (1966), 1st Photo of Earth from Moon (Lunar Orbiter 1)
Aug 23-Sep 01 - Summer Course: Volcanism, Plate Tectonics, Hydrothermal Vents and Life, Azores, Portugal
AUGUST 24 - LAST QUARTER MOON - 10:41 p.m. CDT
Aug 24 - 50th Anniversary (1966), Luna 11 Launch (USSR Moon Orbiter)
Aug 24 - Comet P/1998 VS24 (LINEAR) Closest Approach To Earth (3.066 AU)
Aug 24 - Aten Asteroid 326290 Akhenaten Closest Approach To Earth (0.494 AU)
Aug 24 - Asteroid 44597 Thoreau Closest Approach To Earth (1.355 AU)
Aug 24 - Asteroid 4337 Arecibo Closest Approach To Earth (2.340 AU)
Aug 24 - 10th Anniversary (2006), Pluto Demoted As A Planet
Aug 24-26 - Conference on High Energy Physics, Xi'an, China
Aug 25 - Moon Occults Aldebaran
Aug 25 - Mars Passes 4.4 Degrees from Saturn
**Aug 25 - Northern Iota Aquarids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 25 - Comet 73P-AJ/Schwassmann-Wachmann Closest Approach To Earth (0.479 AU)
Aug 25 - Comet 176P/LINEAR At Opposition (1.725 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 4 Vesta Occults TYC 1343-01188-1 (9.5 Magnitude Star)
Aug 25 - Apollo Asteroid 2005 QQ87 Near-Earth Flyby (0.085 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 149 Medusa Closest Approach To Earth (1.129 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 3313 Mendel Closest Approach To Earth (1.567 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 242516 Lindseystirling Closest Approach To Earth (1.745 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 2919 Dali Closest Approach To Earth (1.797 AU)
Aug 25 - Kuiper Belt Object 2004 NT33 At Opposition (38.053 AU)
Aug 25-26 - 2nd Annual Ocean Worlds Meeting, Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Aug 25-27 - Workshop: Quantum Aspects of Black Holes and its Recent Progress, Yerevan, Armenia
**Aug 26 - Amor Asteroid 433 Eros Closest Approach To Earth (0.725 AU)
Aug 26 - Atira Asteroid 2007 EB26 Closest Approach To Earth (0.882 AU)
Aug 26 - Asteroid 19019 Sunflower Closest Approach To Earth (1.223 AU)
Aug 26 - Asteroid 2451 Dollfus Closest Approach To Earth (1.377 AU)
Aug 26 - Asteroid 7554 Johnspencer Closest Approach To Earth (2.949 AU)
Aug 26 - Kuiper Belt Object 225088 (2007 OR10) At Opposition (86.591 AU)
Aug 26 - 35th Anniversary (1981), Voyager 2, Saturn Flyby
*Aug 26-28 - 30th Annual Alberta Star Party, Starland, Canada
Aug 26-28 - Nova East Star Party, Smileys Provincial Park, Nova Scotia, Canada
Aug 26-28 - RASCals Star Party 2016, Metchosin, Canada
Aug 27 - Mercury Passes 5.3 Degrees From Venus
*Aug 27 - Venus Passes 0.1 Degrees From Jupiter
Aug 27 - Comet C/2015 TQ209 (LINEAR) Perihelion (1.413 AU)
Aug 27 - Comet C/2015 V4 (PANSTARRS) Perihelion (5.460 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 2281 Biela Closest Approach To Earth (0.879 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 1762 Russell Closest Approach To Earth (1.744 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 18235 Lynden-Bell Closest Approach To Earth (2.463 AU)
Aug 27 - Centaur Object 7066 Nessus At Opposition (26.173 AU)
Aug 27 - Kuiper Belt Object 307982 (2004 PG115) At Opposition (36.953 AU)
Aug 27-Sep 04 - 35th International Geological Congress, Cape Town, South Africa
Aug 27-Sep 04 - Merritt Astronomical Society Summer Star Quest 2016, Loon Lake, Canada
Aug 28 - Comet 93P/Lovas At Opposition (1.460 AU)
Aug 28 - Comet 139P/Vaisala-Oterma At Opposition (2.969 AU)
Aug 28 - Comet 159P/LONEOS At Opposition (3.957 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 14220 Alexgibbs Closest Approach To Earth (1.466 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 11947 Kimclijsters Closest Approach To Earth (1.550 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 10378 Ingmarbergman Closest Approach To Earth (1.829 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 204852 Frankfurt Closest Approach To Earth (1.866 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 19482 Harperlee Closest Approach To Earth (1.932 AU)
Aug 28-Sep 18 - Workshop: Approaching the Stellar Astrophysical Limits of Exoplanet Detection - Getting to 10 cm/s, Aspen, Colorado
Aug 29 - Comet 176P/LINEAR Closest Approach To Earth (1.723 AU)
Aug 29 - Comet P/2015 M2 (PANSTARRS) Closest Approach To Earth (5.007 AU)
Aug 29 - Asteroid 118401 LINEAR Closest Approach To Earth (1.722 AU)
Aug 29 - Asteroid 8721 AMOS Closest Approach To Earth (2.786 AU)
Aug 29 - Johann Holetschek's 160th Birthday (1846)
Aug 30 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Titan
Aug 30 - Comet C/2016 A8 (LINEAR) Perihelion (1.880 AU)
Aug 30 - Comet C/2015 TQ209 (LINEAR) Closest Approach To Earth (2.405 AU)
Aug 30 - Comet 330P/Catalina Perihelion (2.953 AU)
Aug 30 - Binary Apollo Asteroid 69230 Hermes Closest Approach To Earth (1.197 AU)
Aug 30 - Plutino 175113 (2004 PF115) At Opposition (40.541 AU)
Aug 30 - Kuiper Belt Object 2003 QX113 At Opposition (58.936 AU)
Aug 30 - 25th Anniversary (1991), Yohkoh Launch
Aug 30 - Ernest Rutherford's 145th Birthday (1871)
Aug 30 - Carl Runge's 160th Birthday (1856)
Aug 30-Sep 03 - International Conference on High Resolution Molecular Spectroscopy, Prague, Czech Republic
Aug 31 - Comet 73P-AA/Schwassmann-Wachmann Perihelion (1.022 AU)
Aug 31 - Comet 144P/Kushida Perihelion (1.431 AU)
Aug 31 - Comet 25D/Neujmin At Opposition (3.853 AU)
Aug 31 - Comet 232P/Hill At Opposition (4.169 AU)
Aug 31 - Asteroid 8080 Intel Closest Approach To Earth (1.107 AU)
Aug 31 - Asteroid 4352 Kyoto Closest Approach To Earth (1.627 AU)
Aug 31 - Apollo Asteroid 2201 Oljato Closest Approach To Earth (2.607 AU)
Aug 31 - Kuiper Belt Object 120178 (2003 OP32) At Opposition (41.166 AU)
Aug 31 - 25th Anniversary (1991), Noblesville Meteorite Fall in Indiana
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