ASOtitle

AUGUST 2017 SKY EVENTS CALENDAR

The ASO Monthly Calendar of Events and Astronomical Data
Calendar is based on the "Space Calendar" data presented by the
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/calendar/ and the Arkansas Sky Observatories  www.arksky.org Team.
If you would like for us to include your star parties or events, please send details via the CONTACT US button on the home page of ASO.


The Planets for August:
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Mercury - Mercury remains hidden by the sun for us, in daylight skies - in LEO

Venus - our brightest planet will not be easy to spot at any time in August, hovering nearly stationary against the eastern morning sky, getting neither higher or lower as the month progresses, but becoming more embedded in twilight toward late month.   - in GEMINI

Mars - Now rapidly increasing its distance from Earth, Mars continues to be hidden in solar glare and will not be viewable for the next couple of months - in CANCER

Jupiter - Now sinking closer to the western horizon each evening during twilight, you can cross Jupiter off of your observing lists until Fall when it will reappear in early morning dawn skies.  It is very low in evening twilight western skies and quite close to the bright star SPICA - in VIRGO

Saturn - Now setting right about midnight local time, the ringed planet is still going to be an easy target and favorite for star parties and neighborhood outings.  This star party favorite will be directly overhead just as evening dusk disappears into darkness.   Note Saturn's yellow color, and the interesting aspect of it not lurking in one of the "Zodiacal Constellations", but far outside the original band of the 12 original Zodiac constellations - in OPHIUCHUS

Uranus - distant planet Uranus rises about 11 p.m. local time and is south of overhead by dawn's fist light.  It shines at magnitude 5.9, bright enough to spot in good binoculars if one knows where to look; use a good planetarium sky program or GO TO telescope to locate this distant world; by sunrise it is high in dark skies and will show a faint, blue disk in large telescopes - in PISCES

Neptune - look for faint Neptune in large telescopes at midmonth south of overhead about 3 a.m. local time.(mag. 7.6); it will be due north (higher) that bright Fomalhaut in southern skies all month, thereby making it a bit easier to spot this distant world. - in AQUARIUS

Pluto - at magnitude 14.1, our most disvery close to the nearly full moon, tant planet (yes....it is a planet) is very low in southern skies, southwest of overhead about 10 p.m.. local time; only 12 inch and larger telescopes can spot this world visually. All month this distant world will appear just east (to the left of) the "Teapot" stars of Sagittarius- in SAGITTARIUS

NOTE:  for locating all of the faint planets I highly recommend a good computer planetarium program or a suitalbe Sky APP for your smart devices!


Comet Possiblities for August:
There are dozens of observable comets visible every month, in every part of the sky.  A moderate-sized telescope and CCD camera can easily record comets down to magnitude 18, of which there will be a good selection every night, provided that you know WHERE in the sky they are.  Thus a good PC planetarium program with your GO TO telescope or to plot visually is essential.  The comets can be updated in yor programs daily by downloading the current data into your database from the Minor Planet Center (MPC) via the link:
http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/Ephemerides/SoftwareEls.html
This will allow access to all visible comets for any given date.

In addition, a listing of "Observable Comets" is availale from MPC from the link:  http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/LastCometObs.html
In the case of a new and exciting/bright comet that may unexpected enter our skies, ALWAYS refer to the ALERTS link on the ASO Home Page.

For the latest observations, magnitudes and physical characteristics of most of the best comets, always look to the ASO Comet Database for accurate information:
  http://arksky.org/comet-data

METEOR SHOWERS for August  2017:
 
Observe when the moon does not interfere and attempt to observe AFTER midnight for most meteors to be seen!  For August there is, of course, the famous PERSEID METEOR SHOWER, some of which provide for wonderful summer sky shows, provided that the light of the moon does not interfere.  However, as with a months and times during the year, observers should always be aware that new sporadic meteor showers can occur at anytime from seemingly unknown sources and radiants.  Unfortunately for June 2016, the full moon occurs at midmonth, which means that pretty much at least some of these showers are going to be less than impressive in terms of faint meteors.

For a full description of how to observe meteors, how to contribute and what to look for, see the ASO GUIDE at:
http://arksky.org/aso/aso-guides/aso-observational-guides/713-all-about-meteors-the-perseid-meteor-shower

August 12 -

This year's
PERSEID meteor shower; what to expect!

Unfortunately this year's Perseid Meteor shower will find a rather large waxing gibbous moon in the sky pretty much all night long (the moon is full on August 7)
The radiant for the Perseids is in the very high northeastern sky and rises well into the night and pretty much opposite the light of the gibbous moon, so some observing might be rewarding; the moon will rise about 11 p.m. providing darker skies and fainter meteors to be seen ONLY in early evening skies.  Nonetheless, there are dozens of huge brilliant and spectacular fireballs that are typically seen from the Perseids, so these can be see in spite of any lights in the sky.

And YES....there are other meteor showers in August as well:

July 31-Aug 1 - CAPRICORNID METEORS - Actually a two day peak, July 31 and August 1, this is a reliable meteor shower and with this month's NEW MOON falling only days away, this is a very favorable year to experience any meteors from this shower.  Remnants from Comet Honda-Mrkos-Padjusakova, this is an early evening meteor shower; you should prepare to begin observing about the time the sky is completely dark, at the end of twilight, some 2 hours after sunset.   There CAN be as many as 35 meteors per hour from this erratic meteor shower and you should plan to watch until well after midnight.

August 6 - Southern Aquarid Meteors - the moon will be full, so this also is a very poor meteor shower for this month.  Emanating from near the bright star Altair (see article, above!), this is a two-part meteor shower, with this being the first, and the "Northern Aquarid Meteors" being later in the month (August 20-22).  This is a sparse meteor shower but has been known to show off a bit during some years.  Normally expect to see a scant 7-8 meteors per hour during a dark and moonless night from this shower.  The radiant will be favorably placed south of overhead about 11 p.m. local time.  Observations of BOTH the northern and southern phases of this meteor shower are badly needed

August 20 - Kappa Cygnid Meteors - this is an excellent year with no moon in the sky for this seemingly growing meteor shower; both this shower and the Andromedid meteors occur within days of one-another, and the radiant is best placed nearly overhead for northern observers by about 2 a.m.  Although there can be many Kappa Cygnid meteors flying about, they are many times confused with the Perseids which typically have ended by Augustt 15.  The moon is nearly full for this meteor shower this year and will be in the sky all night, positioned unfortunately very near the radiants of both these showers.

August 31 - Andromedid Meteors - In 1885 observers recorded up to 13,000 Andromedid meteors from this radiant in a one hour period (!).  This quite unpredictable meteor shower originates from debris of Biela's Comet and there are years when the Earth appears to pass directly through dense portions of the old comet cloud and some years where no meteors will be seen.  This year, the moon a bit greater than quarter and will set after midnight so observations should take place early, concentrating overhead, but with feet toward the north east horizon.

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The ASO August Stars of the Month: ALTAIR and the Summer Triangle

Bright Stars ALTAIR, DENEB and VEGA
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Aquila and its bright star ALTAIR are the southernmost of the dominant summer constellations and together with Deneb (Cygnushttp://arksky.org/aso/aso-guides/aso-constellation-guides/72-cygnus ) and Vega (Lyra - http://arksky.org/aso/aso-guides/aso-constellation-guides/74-lyra) (BOTH from Doc Clay's Guides to the Constellations from ASO) form the bright "summer triangle" so unmistakable in our northern skies.
In addition to Aquila in this part of the sky, we find more southerly SCUTUM (the "shield"), a small but remarkably rich constellation often overlooked or mistakenly thought to be part of larger Aquila.  The stray
shield is that beaconing the warrior Hercules, who has lost his protective barrier in the many challenges he faced throughout Earth and sky.

It is through Cygnus and down into Aquila that the brilliant Sagittarius arm of our Milky Way galaxy is seen; when we gaze at this wonder, we are looking across a vast emptiness of space toward a star-and-nebula
rich spiral arm of the galaxy, and the deeper we go toward the rich star clouds of Sagittarius, the closer we peer at the very hub of the incredible Milky Way and its 200 billion so-odd stars. Image that the earth is a
planet on but one isolated star in an OUTER ARM of the galaxy.....as we gaze toward Aquila and Sagittarius, we are looking INWARD toward the nuclear hub of the galaxy of which WE are part.   Looking the
opposite way -toward Orion and Auriga in winter skies, we look in yet another direction and at yet another, less star-dense galactic arm leading OUT OF the spiral system of stars. .
The next closest galaxy that "resembles" our own Milky Way galaxy is nearly 2.5 billion light years distant.  Every star, planet, cluster, comet, asteroid, meteor, globular...that you see is in OUR galaxy; once beyond
all that "stuff" there is NOTHING....barely a molecule, until you reach the confines of the Andromeda Galaxy.  Imagine yet further that - as you enter that galaxy some 2.5 billion years from now as you travel at
"warp one" (the speed of light) - you begin to see new stars, nebulae and all those things similar to that same stuff from our galaxy that you left behind.  Yes, indeed, the "stuff" of which we are made of is all the
same.....universally everywhere.
.
Although bordering the star-rich Milky Way and containing many wonderful star fields for low power and slow scanning on a dark night, Aquila is curiously void of spectacular deep sky objects and remarkable
multiple stars that are noted in such great numbers nearby. Even the most famous object nearby is often mistakenly placed within the confines of the large eagle's outstretched wings and talons, but indeed the "Great
Scutum Star Cloud' with its fantastically rich star cluster Messier 11 is nonetheless still in "Scutum" to Aquila's south. .
Note that the CELESTIAL EQUATOR passes through the middle sections of Aquila and just north of tiny Scutum. This is the reading "0" degrees on your properly adjusted declination setting circle. All angles
NORTH of this equatorial line are positive ("+") and all angular measures (declinations) south of the celestial equator are negative ("-"); hence you will see references  to both "+" and "-" declinations for celestial
objects.

Take your summer journey into the Eagle's lair and into the great lost shield of the sky warriors via the bright star "ALTAIR", a nice bright yellow star that is commonly referred to in the "asterism" known as the
SUMMER TRIANGLE, a nice wide shape bounded by the bright summer stars Deneb (Cygnus), Vega (Lyra) and Altair (Aquila). See our constellation "GO TO" TOUR for Cygnus for a sky chart showing this spectacular summer marker!
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AUGUST CALENDAR OF EVENTS

**Aug 01 - Alpha Capricornids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 01 - Comet 77P/Longmore Closest Approach To Earth (2.573 AU)
Aug 01 - Comet P/2001 H5 (NEAT) At Opposition (4.188 AU)
Aug 01 - Asteroid 3140 Stellafane Closest Approach To Earth (1.830 AU)
Aug 01 - Asteroid 22739 Sikhote-Alin Closest Approach To Earth (2.034 AU)
Aug 01 - Asteroid 29132 Bradpitt Closest Approach to Earth (2.169 AU)
Aug 01 - Asteroid 1125 China Closest Approach To Earth (2.736 AU)
Aug 01 - Kuiper Belt Object 2013 AT183 At Opposition (63.416 AU)
Aug 02 - Asteroid 20488 Pic-du-Midi Closest Approach To Earth (1.365 AU)
Aug 02 - Asteroid 30441 Curly Closest Approach To Earth (1.644 AU)
Aug 02 - Asteroid 9997 COBE Closest Approach To Earth (1.646 AU)
Aug 02 - Peter Jenniskens' 55th Birthday (1962)Aug 02-04 - Conference: U.S. Radio/Millimeter/Submillimeter Science Futures III, Berkeley, California
Aug 02-05 - Workshop: The Circle of Life - Connecting the Intergalactic, Circumgalactic, and Interstellar Media, Kruger Park, South Africa
Aug 03 - TDRS M Atlas 5 Launch
Aug 03 - Comet 73P-AS/Schwassmann-Wachmann Perihelion (0.960 AU)
Aug 03 - Comet C/2015 H2 (PANSTARRS) Closest Approach To Earth (4.618 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 281 Lucretia Closest Approach To Earth (1.203 AU)
Aug 03 - Asteroid 6377 Cagney Closest Approach To Earth (1.451 AU)
Aug 03 - Centaur Object 52872 Okyrhoe At Opposition (9.587 AU)
Aug 03-05 - IF GR+HEP+Cosmo International Symposium VI, Trieste, Italy
Aug 04 - Comet 2P/Encke At Opposition (1.288 AU)
Aug 04 - Asteroid 12485 Jenniferharris Closest Approach To Earth (1.219 AU)
Aug 04 - Asteroid 4970 Druyan Closest Approach To Earth (1.486 AU)
Aug 04 - Asteroid 216 Kleopatra Closest Approach To Earth (1.672 AU)
Aug 04 - Asteroid 6676 Monet Closest Approach To Earth (2.627 AU)
Aug 04 - 10th Anniversary (2007), Phoenix Launch (Mars Lander)
Aug 04-13 - Summer School on Cosmology, Valjevo, Serbia
Aug 05 - GRACE-FO 1 & 2 Dnepr-1 Launch
Aug 05 - Comet 339P/Gibbs Closest Approach To Earth (2.688 AU)
Aug 05 - Comet 116P/Wild Closest Approach To Earth (2.866 AU)
Aug 05 - Kuiper Belt Object 2008 OG19 At Opposition (37.654 AU)
Aug 05 - 5th Anniversary (2012), Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), Mars Landing
Aug 05 - Brian Marsden's 80th Birthday (1937) - Doc Clay's mentor
**Aug 06 - Southern Iota Aquarids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 06 - Comet 189P/NEAT Perihelion (1.213 AU)
Aug 06 - Comet P/2009 S2 (McNaught) Closest Approach To Earth (1.461 AU)
Aug 06 - Comet 259P/Garradd Perihelion (1.809 AU)
Aug 06 - Comet 171P/Spahr At Opposition (3.037 AU)
Aug 06 - Asteroid 5247 Krylov Occults HIP 104172 (6.1 Magnitude Star)
Aug 06 - Asteroid 3351 Smith Closest Approach To Earth (1.530 AU)
Aug 06 - Asteroid 1258 Sicilia Closest Approach To Earth (2.109 AU)
Aug 06 - Sylvain Arend's 115th Birthday (1902)
Aug 06 - Johann Bernoulli's 350th Birthday (1667)
AUGUST 07 - FULL MOON -  1:11 p.m. CDT
**Aug 07 - Partial Lunar Eclipse
Aug 07 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Janus, Atlas & Epimetheus
Aug 07 - Comet 236P/LINEAR At Opposition (1.118 AU)
Aug 07 - Comet C/2017 D2 (Barros) Closest Approach To Earth (1.501 AU)
Aug 07 - Apollo Asteroid 1991 VG Near-Earth Flyby (0.057 AU)
Aug 07 - Apollo Asteroid 2007 PS9 Near-Earth Flyby (0.077 AU)
Aug 07 - Apollo Asteroid 2016 YR Near-Earth Flyby (0.095 AU)
Aug 07 - Asteroid 3672 Stevedberg Closest Approach To Earth (1.173 AU)
Aug 07 - Asteroid 8664 Grigorijrichters Closest Approach To Earth (1.279 AU)
Aug 07 - Asteroid 5553 Chodas Closest Approach To Earth (2.218 AU)
Aug 07 - 20th Anniversary (1997), STS-85 Launch (Space Shuttle Discovery, CRISTA-SPAS)
Aug 07-09 - 2017 National Astronomy Teaching Summit, Ft. Myers, Florida
Aug 07-10 - 6th International Conference on Agro-Geoinformatics, Fairfax, Virginia
Aug 07-11 - 30th National Solar Observatory Workshop: High-resolution Solar Physics - Past, Present, Future, Boulder, Colorado
Aug 08 - Apollo Asteroid 2003 OT13 Near-Earth Flyby (0.093 AU)
Aug 08 - Aten Asteroid 153415 (2001 QP153) Near-Earth Flyby (0.095 AU)
Aug 08 - Asteroid 25924 Douglasadams Closest Approach To Earth (1.162 AU)
Aug 08 - Asteroid 3673 Levy Closest Approach To Earth (1.408 AU)
Aug 08 - 10th Anniversary (2007), STS-118 Launch (Space Shuttle Endeavour, International Space Station)
Aug 08 - 40th Anniversary (1977), Salyut 5 Space Station Burnup
Aug 09 - Moon Occults Neptune
Aug 09 - Comet 198P/ODAS Closest Approach To Earth (2.783 AU)
Aug 09 - Asteroid 12477 Haiku Closest Approach To Earth (1.413 AU)
Aug 09 - Asteroid 6227 Alanrubin Closest Approach To Earth (1.811 AU)
Aug 09 - 135th Anniversary (1872), 1st Photo of the Spectrum of a Star (Vega) by Henry Draper
Aug 09-11 - 8th Planetary Crater Consortium Meeting, Flagstaff, Arizona
Aug 10 - Comet 73P-AL/Schwassmann-Wachmann Closest Approach To Earth (0.277 AU)
Aug 10 - Comet 38P/Stephan-Oterma At Opposition (3.978 AU)
Aug 10 - Apollo Asteroid 2015 XO128 Near-Earth Flyby (0.095 AU)
Aug 10 - Asteroid 945 Barcelona Closest Approach To Earth (2.030 AU)
Aug 10 - Asteroid 17062 Bardot Closest Approach To Earth (2.057 AU)
Aug 11 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Titan
Aug 11 - Comet 73P-AP/Schwassmann-Wachmann Perihelion (0.959 AU)
Aug 11 - Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann At Opposition (4.813 AU)
Aug 11 - Asteroid 1587 Kahrstedt Occults HIP 32311 (5.4 Magnitude Star)
Aug 11 - Asteroid 18024 Dobson Closest Approach To Earth (2.185 AU)
Aug 11 - 55th Anniversary (1962), Vostok 3 Launch
Aug 11 - 140th Anniversary (1877), Asaph Hall's Discovery of Mars Moon Deimos
**Aug 11-13 - Mt. Carleton Star Party, Mount Carleton Provincial Park, Canada
Aug 12 - Comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) At Opposition (1.714 AU)
Aug 12 - Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann Closest Approach To Earth (4.813 AU)
Aug 12 - Aten Asteroid 2013 ND15 (Venus Trojan) Closest Approach To Earth (1.160 AU)
Aug 12 - Asteroid 13212 Jayleno Closest Approach To Earth (1.299 AU)
Aug 12 - Apollo Asteroid 5143 Heracles Closest Approach To Earth (1.634 AU)
Aug 12 - Asteroid 8991 Solidarity Closest Approach To Earth (1.663 AU)
Aug 12 - 40th Anniversary (1977), HEAO 1 Launch
Aug 12 - 55th Anniversary (1962), Vostok 4 Launch
Aug 13 - Comet C/2017 D2 (Barros) At Opposition (1.505 AU)
Aug 13 - Comet 214P/LINEAR At Opposition (3.401 AU)
Aug 13 - Comet 203P/Korlevic At Opposition (4.122 AU)
Aug 13 - Apollo Asteroid 2014 OA339 Near-Earth Flyby (0.032 AU)
Aug 13 - Apollo Asteroid 2003 MJ4 Near-Earth Flyby (0.098 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 4147 Lennon Closest Approach To Earth (1.346 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 3895 Earhart Closest Approach To Earth (1.739 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 447 Valentine Closest Approach To Earth (1.936 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 284996 Rosaparks Closest Approach To Earth (2.050 AU)
Aug 13 - Asteroid 656 Beagle Closest Approach To Earth (2.544 AU)
Aug 13 - 345th Anniversary (1672), Christiaan Huygens' Discovery of Mars' South Polar Cap
AUGUST 14 - LAST QUARTER MOON - 08:14 p.m. CDT
Aug 14 - Comet P/2007 V1 (Larson) At Opposition (3.222 AU)
Aug 14 - Asteroid 930 Westphalia Occults HIP 34358 (5.9 Magnitude Star)
Aug 14 - Asteroid 13609 Lewicki Closest Approach To Earth (1.293 AU)
Aug 14 - 25th Anniversary (1992), Mbale Meteorite Fall (Hit Boy in Uganda)
Aug 15 - Comet 116P/Wild At Opposition (2.882 AU)
Aug 15 - Comet P/2010 B2 (WISE) At Opposition (3.450 AU)
Aug 15 - Comet P/2009 WX51 (Catalina) At Opposition (4.198 AU)
Aug 15 - Comet 95P/Chiron Occults 2UCAC 32806659 (14.3 Magnitude Star)
Aug 15 - Apollo Asteroid 414990 (2011 EM51) Near-Earth Flyby (0.078 AU)
Aug 15 - Asteroid 3933 Portugal Closest Approach To Earth (1.967 AU)
Aug 15 - Lecture: Venus - The Forgotten, Mysterious Planet, Washington DC
Aug 16 - Moon Occults Aldebaran
Aug 16 - Comet 77P/Longmore At Opposition (2.601 AU)
Aug 16 - Comet 3D/Biela At Opposition (2.887 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 37582 Faraday Closest Approach To Earth (0.952 AU)
Aug 16 - Asteroid 2713 Luxemburg Closest Approach To Earth (1.799 AU)
Aug 16-18 - Workshop: Numerical Techniques in MHD Simulations, Cologne, Germany
Aug 17 - Comet 69P/Taylor At Opposition (3.139 AU)
Aug 17 - Comet C/2015 H2 (PANSTARRS) At Opposition (4.644 AU)
Aug 17 - Apollo Asteroid 2002 CY58 Near-Earth Flyby (0.068 AU)
Aug 17 - Apollo Asteroid 2016 CD137 Near-Earth Flyby (0.099 AU)
Aug 17 - Atira Asteroid 2015 ME131 Closest Approach To Earth (0.415 AU)
Aug 17 - Asteroid 5107 Laurenbacall Closest Approach To Earth (2.271 AU)
Aug 17 - Kathyrn Thornton's 65th Birthday (1952)
Aug 17 - 140th Anniversary (1877), Asaph Hall's Discovery of Mars Moon Phobos
Aug 17 - 260th Anniversary (1757), The Opening of the Macfarlane Observatory
Aug 18 - Comet P/2010 P4 (WISE) Perihelion (1.861 AU)
Aug 18 - Comet 164P/Christensen Closest Approach To Earth (2.026 AU)
Aug 18 - Apollo Asteroid 2012 BD14 Near-Earth Flyby (0.067 AU)
Aug 18 - Asteroid 13208 Fraschetti Closest Approach To Earth (0.966 AU)
Aug 19 - Comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) Closest Approach To Earth (1.707 AU)
Aug 19 - Comet 30P/Reinmuth Perihelion (1.877 AU)
Aug 19 - Asteroid 3654 AAS Closest Approach To Earth (0.982 AU)
Aug 19 - Asteroid 1132 Hollandia Closest Approach To Earth (1.016 AU)
Aug 19-26 - Merritt Summer Star Quest 2017, Loon Lake, Canada
Aug 20 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Pandora, Pan & Daphnis
Aug 20 - Asteroid 3852 Glennford Closest Approach To Earth (1.708 AU)
Aug 20 - Asteroid 78577 JPL Closest Approach To Earth (2.003 AU)
Aug 20 - Asteroid 48575 Hawaii Closest Approach To Earth (2.299 AU)
Aug 20 - Asteroid 249516 Aretha Closest Approach To Earth (2.325 AU)
Aug 20 - Asteroid 5335 Damocles (Burnt Out Comet) At Opposition (19.683 AU)
Aug 20 - 40th Anniversary (1977), Voyager 2 Launch
Aug 20-22 - nuEclipse Workshop, Knoxville, Tennessee
Aug 20-24 - Conference: Exoclipse 2017 - Exploring New Worlds In the Shade, Boise, Idaho
Aug 20-24 - Conference: Molecules in Space - Linking the Interstellar Medium to (Exo)planets, Washington DC
AUGUST 21 - NEW MOON - 1:30 p.m. CDT
** Aug 21 - Total Solar Eclipse (Visible from United States) - The BIG one!  JOIN US at Petit Jean State Park for Eclipse viewing.
Aug 21 - Comet C/2015 VL62 Closest Approach To Earth (1.742 AU)
Aug 21 - Comet C/2015 VL62 At Opposition (1.742 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 5540 Smirnova Closest Approach To Earth (0.824 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 1850 Kohoutek Closest Approach To Earth (1.135 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 1814 Bach Closest Approach To Earth (1.339 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 15332 CERN Closest Approach To Earth (1.566 AU)
Aug 21 - Asteroid 6639 Marchis Closest Approach To Earth (1.841 AU)
Aug 21 - 45th Anniversary (1972), Copernicus Launch
Aug 22 - Comet 5D/Brorsen Closest Approach To Earth (1.120 AU)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 3 Juno Occults 2UCAC 28762234 (12.4 Magnitude Star)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 2865 Laurel Closest Approach To Earth (1.498 AU)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 804 Hispania Closest Approach To Earth (1.439 AU)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 1791 Patsayev Closest Approach To Earth (1.511 AU)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 8423 Macao Closest Approach To Earth (1.627 AU)
Aug 22 - Asteroid 289586 Shackleton Closest Approach To Earth (1.644 AU)
Aug 23 - Comet 49P/Arend-Rigaux At Opposition (2.273 AU)
Aug 23 - Comet 247P/LINEAR At Opposition (3.161 AU)
Aug 23 - Comet P/2016 BA14 (PANSTARRS) At Opposition (3.283 AU)
Aug 23-27 - Saskatchewan Summer Star Party, Cypress Hills, Canada
Aug 24 - Comet 73P-BC/Schwassmann-Wachmann Closest Approach To Earth (0.441 AU)
Aug 24 - Comet 339P/Gibbs At Opposition (2.742 AU)
Aug 24 - Comet P/2011 W2 (Rinner) At Opposition (3.115 AU)
Aug 24 - Comet 252P/LINEAR At Opposition (3.308 AU)
Aug 24 - Comet P/2016 A7 (PANSTARRS) At Opposition (3.550 AU)
Aug 24 - Apollo Asteroid 54509 YORP Closest Approach To Earth (0.652 AU)
Aug 24 - Asteroid 2531 Cambridge Closest Approach To Earth (2.176 AU)
Aug 24 - Asteroid 88705 Potato Closest Approach To Earth (2.213 AU)
Aug 24 - Asteroid 51827 Laurelclark Closest Approach To Earth (2.309 AU)
**Aug 25 - Northern Iota Aquarids Meteor Shower Peak
Aug 25 - Apollo Asteroid 2005 QQ87 Near-Earth Flyby (0.087 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 2598 Merlin Closest Approach To Earth (1.651 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 2305 King Closest Approach To Earth (1.732 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 2742 Gibson Closest Approach To Earth (1.851 AU)
Aug 25 - Asteroid 18728 Grammier Closest Approach To Earth (2.123 AU)
Aug 26 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Titan
Aug 27 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Janus, Daphnis, Prometheus, Epimetheus, Pandora & Pan
Aug 27 - Comet C/2016 P4 (PANSTARRS) Closest Approach To Earth (5.316 AU)
Aug 27 - Amor Asteroid 2202 Pele Closest Approach To Earth (0.670 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 5945 Roachapproach Closest Approach To Earth (0.909 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 51824 Mikeanderson Closest Approach To Earth (1.661 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 2710 Veverka Closest Approach To Earth (1.703 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 9025 Polansky Closest Approach To Earth (1.757 AU)
Aug 27 - Asteroid 508 Princetonia Closest Approach To Earth (2.188 AU)
Aug 27 - Kuiper Belt Object 225088 (2007 OR10) At Opposition (86.829 AU)
Aug 27 - 55th Anniversary (1962), Mariner 2 Launch
Aug 28 - Cassini, Distant Flyby of Titan
Aug 28 - Comet 349P/Lemmon Perihelion (2.496 AU)
Aug 28 - Comet C/2015 VL62 Perihelion (2.720 AU)
Aug 28 - Amor Asteroid 2015 RQ35 Near-Earth Flyby (0.098 AU)
Aug 28 - Apollo Asteroid 3752 Camillo Closest Approach To Earth (0.558 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 29470 Higgs Closest Approach To Earth (1.575 AU)
Aug 28 - Asteroid 293 Brasilia Closest Approach To Earth (2.207 AU)
Aug 28 - Kuiper Belt Object 408706 (2004 NT33) At Opposition (38.173 AU)
AUGUST 13 - FIRST QUARTER MOON - 3:13 a.m.  CDT
Aug 29 - Comet 236P/LINEAR Closest Approach To Earth (1.074 AU)
Aug 29 - Aten Asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom Closest Approach To Earth (1.212 AU)
Aug 29 - Asteroid 14094 Garneau Closest Approach To Earth (1.765 AU)
Aug 29 - Centaur Object 7066 Nessus At Opposition (26.750 AU)
Aug 29 - Kuiper Belt Object 307982 (2004 PG115) At Opposition (37.184 AU)
Aug 30 - Comet 145P/Shoemaker-Levy Perihelion (1.897 AU)
Aug 30 - Asteroid 87 Sylvia (2 Moons) Closest Approach To Earth (2.176 AU)
Aug 31 - Comet P/2008 T4 (Hill) At Opposition (2.126 AU)
Aug 31 - Dwarf Planet Ceres Occults TYC 1910-00447-1 (7.9 Magnitude Star)
Aug 31 - Asteroid 5040 Rabinowitz Closest Approach To Earth (0.891 AU)
Aug 31 - Asteroid 2575 Bulgaria Closest Approach To Earth (1.215 AU)
Aug 31 - Asteroid 1159 Granada Closest Approach To Earth (1.262 AU)
Aug 31 - Asteroid 2864 Soderblom Closest Approach To Earth (2.137 AU)
Aug 31 - Centaur Object 944 Hidalgo At Opposition (3.287 AU)
Aug 31 - Kuiper Belt Object 2003 QX113 At Opposition (59.043 AU)
Aug 31 - 85th Anniversary (1932), 1st Photo Showing Moon's Shadow on the Earth during Solar Ecipse Taken By Capt Albert Stevens
Aug 31 - 175th Anniverdary (1842), US Naval Observatory Authorized by Act of Congress

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Clear skies and bright comets for all!
Doc Clay
Arkansas Sky Observatoriese
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