ASOtitle
 

NOW is the time to Supercharge in time for your BEST views of Splendid Summer Skies!
----------------------------------------
The Solar System in April 2016 : (see also ASO Planet Patrol Image Archives for Daily Updates!)
NOTE:  An excellent month for planetary viewing, with Jupiter and Saturn ruling the skies!
.
Mercury - Although VERY close to the sun and in strong twilight in April, watch for Mercury to climb into the western sky a bit higher each night after April 20; from the 21-24, watch as tiny bright Mercury moves eastward past the ruddy red planet MARS - in ARIES
.
Venus - Very bright and high in western April skies this 2015, in the constellation of Taurus.  This is a very favorable time to view Venus, with its disk about 75% illuminated as we see it from Earth and at magnitude -4.1 brighter than any object in the sky exept for the sun and moon! - in TAURUS.
.
Mars - Now, so close to the sun that it cannot be observed, Mars will be moving into solar conjuction for the next couple of months and will not be visible until late 2015 - in ARIES
.
Jupiter -  Our mightiest of planets, Jupiter, will be directly overhead at dark this month, a very dominating yellow orb straight up for northern observers; although the planet is a bit farther from us than last month, it is still a wonderful telescopic object. .  - In CANCER
.
Saturn -  The ringed planet will be rising at about 11 p.m. local time and will dominate the skies this month and through the summer.   This remarkable planet is very favorably placed with the rings tilted favorably toward earth this month  - in LIBRA
.
Uranus -  This distant blue orb is too close to the sun to see this month, rising only minutes ahead of sunrise in strong dawn twilight - in PISCES
.
Neptune - Those with large telescopes might be able to glimpse this distant planet in morning skies, rising about one hour ahead of sunrise and very close to brilliant VENUS this month.- in AQUARIUS
Pluto - Now rising in southern skies during morning hours at abour 2 a.m. local time, and high in the southeastern sky by midnight; a telescope is needed to view this 14th magnitude distant planet -  In SAGITTARIUS
.
   
NOTE: to locate the three outer planets, we recommend you use the charts from a good planetarium PC program! 
ALSO see the finder charts on line from  Sky & Telescope Magazine for yearly details and very nice tracking charts....visit:
www.SkyandTelescope.com/UranusNeptune
.
---------------------------------------- 
.
Observable COMETS and the ASO Comet Patrol:
.
.
Note that the locations and predictions for brightness, tail, etc. of all comets can be found for nearlyl all major/popular PC planetarium programs from the Harvard/Minor Planet Center's excellent source at:
which is updated quite often with all new comets and refined orbits for those already known!  The following data is estimated for early MID-April, and will vary depending on time of night that you are observing.  Note that the following list of comets gives information for about mid-month and around midnight local time.
NOTE that there are no naked eye comets forecast for April 2016.
.
SOME INTERESTING COMETS:
.
Comet 252P LINEAR - A comet with an offspring (p2016 BA14) this comet is now moving rapidly into northern skies; it is huge and has a very large and open coma that can easily be seen in binoculars; although in deep southern skies at the beginning of the month this comet is moving rapidly northward and will rise about midnight for the northern observers.   See the "Alerts" section of ASO for details on this comet as well as many photographs of the comet in previous months.
 .
Comet 29P (Schwassmann-Wachmann) -  this is always an exciting and explosive (literally!) comet; presently in southern skies.   As always, we recommend continuous monitoring of this exciting comet which has been known to fragment into dozens of pieces on several occasions.  Observations in January and February from ASO showed a very pronounced and strongly illuminated coma in outburst, with a broad fan-shaped, and perhaps even some spiral structure to the head of the comet.  Watch this one!
.
OTHER COMETS VISIBLE:  There are many comets visible in April 2016 in the 13th through 17th magnitude range and easily viewed or captured via CCD in modest telescopes.  Observers should visit the Harvard/Minor Planet Center Observable Comets Page at:
http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/CometLists.htmlwhere comets and their predicted activity are updated nearly daily.
For your individual PC program or telescope GO TO operation drives, you can download exact specifications formatted to YOUR PC protocol from the MPC at:
-----------------------------------------
.
THE APRIL 4 TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE MOON, April Lyrid Meteors!!
.
A very special treat is in store for stargazers in the western USA as well as most of the south Pacific, Australia, etc.  The full moon on april 4 will undergo over 9 hours in various stages of eclipse by the earth's shadow.  Those living WEST of Arkansas Sky Observatory will be able to view the eclipse all the way into totality, but for ASO and points east, the moon will be setting just as totality begins on the morning of April 4.  For full details and a map of the path of the earth's shadow, see the NASA site: 
Another April highlight will be the Lyrid Meteor Shower Peak on April 22-25; on the peak the quarter moon will be setting about midnight and leaving the best period for observing meteors: after midnight - dark and inviting for up to 25-30 meteors to be seen this year!
------------------------------------------
The ASO APRIL Stars of the Month: the Constellation of LIBRA
.
 "LIBRA" (pronounced: "LEE-bra")
Constellation of LIBRA
.
Libra, like the constellation of Lupus is somewhat of a "newcomer" as far as named constellations go. It is ONLY because of its location within the ZODIAC - the twelve star patterns near the celestial equator through which all the planets, sun and moon appear to pass as we observe from Earth - that Libra is denoted as a "stand-alone" constellation at all!
.
The only four brighter stars of Libra - alpha, beta, gamma and iota - for a small square shape in the sky, but at one time the star group was actually part of SCORPIUS (http://www.weasner.com/etx/ref_guides/scorpius.html ), forming the "claws" or front pinchers of this venomous arachnid. It was the Egyptian priest-astronomers who first isolated the larger Scorpius into two separate constellations, although the reasoning is NOT all that clear for doing so.
.
There is speculation however as to the importance of this dull star group to these early people. It is theorized from much later hieroglypics from those of the great Pyramids that the pattern of obscure stars symbolized the EQUALITY of day and night.....exactly what happened at the spring and autumn equinox as the SUN entered this now-constellation some 2000 years ago. Presently, through precession of the Earth, the autumnal equinox - where the sun crosses the celestial equator at the beginning of autumn has "migrated" from Libra westward into Virgo (see http://www.weasner.com/etx/ref_guides/virgo.html ).
.
In the year 2016 and beyond for our lifetimes, the sun goes through Libra in November, passing bright Antares (in Scorpius) in the first week in December as it approaches Winter Solstice.
Now - a lesson in changes of history, and how most things really make sense if you know all the facts. Remember the ZODIAC? The name is from the Latin as the "zone of animals," signifying the nature of the constellations that primarily the sun passed through to early stargazers. The ONLY constellation of the Zodiac that is NOT an "animal" is......LIBRA. Why? Because Libra has not always "been there..." It originally was part of the 6th "sign" of the Zodiac: Scorpius.
.
This explanation as to the Egyptian importance of making this a separated entity in the sky ALSO explains very well why we envision a "scale" or "balance" of all things for this constellation. It seems somewhat out of place, doesn't it? Well, when you consider the importance of the fall equinox and the position of this constellation over 2000 years ago as winter months approached....perhaps it quickly explains both the significance and labeling of this inconspicuous star pattern.
.
Although now a stand-alone ("isolated" is a good word for Libra) constellation of its own, Libra still has strong ties to its original affiliation with Scorpius through the original star names given to its brightest stars by the earliest Arabian skywatchers. We often overlook the beauty and creativity of their insight into the wonderful star names that we still preserve (thankfully) today.  
The principal stars (although very faint to the naked eye) all have some association with CLAWS of the dreaded Scorpion! "ZUBEN ....." referred to the appendages of this creature to the Arabian astronomers/astrologers. Thus, we have the brightest (alpha) star named ZUBEN EL GENUBI ("the Southern Claw"), beta being ZUBEN ESCHAMALI ("the Northern Claw"), ZUBEN EL AKRAB (gamma), ZUBEN EL AKRIBI (delta), and ZUBEN HAKRIABI (upsilon).
Aren't these simply wonderful star names?
------------------------------------------
.
APRIL METEOR SHOWERS: 
Observe when the moon does not interfere and attempt to observe AFTER midnight for most meteors to be seen!  For April, there are no less than NINE meteor showers, some of which provide for wonderful spring sky shows, provided that the light of the moon does not interfere.  However, as with a months and times during the year, observers should always be aware that new sporadic meteor showers can occur at anytime from seemingly unknown sources and radiants.  NOTE:  one of the most interesting of all meteor showers is the odd "April Fireballs" (see below) which occur this month.
.
April 4 - Kappa Serpentid Meteors - This is a one-week-duration meteor shower, from April 1 through 7, with somewhat of a mild peak about midway through that period; look for the radiant to rise in the constellation of Serpens about 8 p.m local time just south of due east and be nearly overhead for observers in southern latitudes of the northern hemisphere at about 2 a.m.  Several meteors per hour should be seen from this minor radiant in normal years, and this year is poor since the moon will be full at this peak and dominate the sky all night long
.
April 7 - Delta Draconid Meteors - With no particular peak to speak of, this is one of those "circumpolar" meteor showers for northern hemisphere observers that will be in the sky pretty much all night; it is a very long duration shower from late March until about April 17.  Found only in 1971 in the constellation of Draco, the meteors are conspicuously slow and leave very fine trains in their wakes; to view the most meteors from this now-annual shower, set up about 10 p.m. local time and face somewhat northeast; as the night progresses the meteors will be originating more and more from very high northern skies....thus after midnight direct your sights to nearly directly overhead, the ZENITH.  Note that the moon, slightly less than full and very bright before midnight will hamper observations during the course of the night
.
April 10 -Viginid Meteors - This is the first of THREE meteor showers which appear to emanate from the constellation of VIRGO during the month of April each year.  A two-week display, the meteors can be seen coming from just south of overhead (northern hemisphere) from April 1 through 15 with no definite peak; to differentiate THIS shower from the other two, the radiant is centered at near right ascension 12h 24m / declination 00 degrees.  This year the moon is strongly gibbous and its light will interfere until just before dawn, so this will be an unfavorable year for this meteor shower..
.
April 14 - THE APRIL FIREBALLS - A particularly good year for this interesting shower in early morning hours because the thin crescent moon will be rising well after midnight and should not hamper observations on this date!....., but then again being bright fireballs, these can be seen in spite of even city lights!   As its name suggests, this can sometimes be a pretty spectacular display if the conditions are right and the skies are dark; however, during times of the new moon - as it was in 2010 - , these huge and bright fireballs come streaking clearly across our crisp and clear springtime skies along with countless fainter meteors that are associated with no identified meteor swarm.  This unusual display lasts for the last two full weeks of April....there is no known radiant or seeming point of origin for this curious group, and they can be seen originating from just about any part of the dark night sky.  They likewise are not - or appear to not be - associated with any other known major or minor meteor shower group.  The April Fireballs are characterized by tremendously bright meteors, nearly all of which demonstrate beautiful and long-lasting trails through the sky.   Even with the bright moon however, with their brightness, the light should not interfere for observing these very spectacular meteors.  Always look for the April Fireballs late in the night, preferably after midnight.   Because of the late nature of the peak of these unusual meteors, 2015 should be a  favorable time to try to catch a few of these.  NOTE:  several of these renegade meteors have been known to reach the ground as meteorites!  Heads UP!
.
April 17 - Sigma Leonid Meteors - The Sigma Leonids are no longer "in" Leo....they have migrated it seems into Virgo to become one of our three Virgo showers for April.  The radiant is up early, just due south of overhead about 9:30 p.m. local time; this is a minor shower with only a few members seen on dark nights per hour.  The nearly new moon will be absent from the sky all night  so it should not interfere with observations of this shower
.
April 22 - The Lyrid Meteor Shower - Other than some spectacular fireworks from the April Fireballs (see above), this is April's most dependable meteor showers and typically one of the best of each year; this year the first quarter moon will not interfere with any observing of meteors meteors after midnight, typically the best time to view the greatest number of Lyrids.  This shower is comprised of cometary debris from Comet Thatcher, a very famous comet last seen in 1861.  Althought this associated comet was not identified until only 100 or so years ago, this meteor shower from it's demise is one of the oldest known on record, being recorded by the ancient Chinese stargazers first in 687 B.C.  As with many meteor showers - and the comets they come from - this one seems to be waning with every encounter with the earth however.  It is no longer the sky spectacle as recorded by those earliest skywatchers.  Look for the meteors to emanate from a point on the Hercules-Lyra border, very near the brilliant blue-white star Vega.  The radiant rises about 7:30 p.m. local time, but the best time to see the most meteors each year is always around midnight when the radiant is nearly directly overhead at midnight for northern hemisphere observers.
.
April 25 Mu Virginid Meteors - This is our third of three meteor showers within the constellation of Virgo for the month of April, and is south of overhead about 1 a.m. local time, far in the eastern realms of the large Virgo constellation; it takes dark, moonless skies to see the few  - only about 7 per hour - meteors from this annual minor display.  The quarter moon will seet shortly after midnight, so you might wait until late for this one!
.
April 23 - Grigg-Skjellerup Meteors - Here is an oddity just by its name...the only annual meteor shower known by the comet from which the meteoroid cloud came!  It also is unique in that it is a "localized" meteor shower, visible only in certain parts of the world, but not others, on each pass.  For example, there was a brilliant display of these meteors seen in New Zealand in 1977....but not one in the United States.  If visible, they will be seen early in the evening, originating south of overhead.  At right ascension 07h 48m / declination -45 degrees, these will appear to be coming literally from the south horizon for northern hemisphere observers, perhaps the only way to differentiate them from the other meteors showers in the same direction of sky each April.  This year is a poor year for this unusual meteor shower since the quarter moon will dominate the early evenint period in which this shower should be seen.
.
April 28 - Alpha Bootid Meteors - Coming from a point very near the bright "alpha star" Capella in the constellation of Bootes, this radiant is in the sky from dusk until dawn, and nearly overhead at about 1 a.m.  Look for these meteors to be few, BUT those that are seen are typically very fine fireballs moving slowly across the sky and leaving beautiful "smoky trails" behind them.  Observers will be hampered by moonlight for this shower in 2015 - the radiant rises about 3-4 hours after sunset, and the moon will be dominant in the sky for this meteor shower in 2016
--------------------------------------------------------------- 
.
APRIL 2016
.
IMPORTANT EVENTS TO REMEMBER:
    .
 
Apr 01 - Asteroid 3 Juno Occults TYC 4991-00651-1 (11.9 Magnitude Star)
Apr 01 - Asteroid 1159 Granada Closest Approach To Earth (1.428 AU)
Apr 01 - Asteroid 7495 Feynman Closest Approach To Earth (1.519 AU)
Apr 01 - Asteroid 39566 Carllewis Closest Approach To Earth (1.767 AU)
Apr 01 - Asteroid 14702 Benclark Closest Approach To Earth (2.107 AU)
Apr 01 - Asteroid 2046 Leningrad Closest Approach To Earth (2.701 AU)
Apr 02 - Comet 100P/Hartley Perihelion (2.011 AU)
Apr 02 - Comet 106P/Schuster At Opposition (3.716 AU)
Apr 02 - Comet 84P/Giclas At Opposition (4.249 AU)
Apr 02 - 80th Anniversary (1936), Yurtuk Meteorite Fall (Hit House in Ukraine)
Apr 02 - Clement Ader's 175th Birthday (1841)
Apr 03 - Asteroid 18458 Caesar Closest Approach To Earth (1.003 AU)
Apr 03 - Asteroid 13609 Lewicki Closest Approach To Earth (1.599 AU)
Apr 03 - Gus Grissom's 90th Birthday (1926)
Apr 03 - Hermann Vogel's 175th Birthday (1841)
Apr 04 - Cassini, Titan Flyby
Apr 04 - Asteroid 5748 Davebrin Closest Approach To Earth (1.696 AU)
Apr 04 - Asteroid 886 Washingtonia Closest Approach To Earth (3.035 AU)
Apr 04-05 - 16th British Gravity Meeting (BritGrav16), Nottingham, United Kingdom
Apr 04-08 - International Venus Conference 2016, Oxford, United Kingdom
Apr 04-08 - Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference (SCTC), Noordwijk, The Netherlands
Apr 05 - Asteroid 12410 Donald Duck Closest Approach To Earth (1.272 AU)
Apr 05 - Asteroid 29470 Higgs Closest Approach To Earth (1.411 AU)
Apr 06 - Asteroid 9387 Tweeddledee Closest Approach To Earth (1.180 AU)
Apr 06 - Asteroid 2865 Laurel Closest Approach To Earth (1.491 AU)
Apr 06 - Asteroid 3062 Wren Closest Approach To Earth (2.381 AU)
Apr 06 - Asteroid 9012 Benner Closest Approach To Earth (2.773 AU)
Apr 06-08 - Workshop on Atmospheric Blocking, Reading, United Kingdom
Apr 06-09 - Conference: From Stars to Massive Stars, Gainesville, Florida
Apr 07 - Cassini, Orbital Trim Maneuver #446 (OTM-446)
Apr 07 - Comet 19P/Borrelly At Opposition (2.395 AU)
Apr 07 - Comet 201P/LONEOS At Opposition (2.934 AU)
Apr 07 - Asteroid 4487 Pocahontas Closest Approach To Earth (1.241 AU)
Apr 07 - 125th Anniversary (1891), Indarch Meteorite Fall in Azerbaijan
Apr 07 - Erik Fredholm's 150th Birthday (1866)
Apr 08 - Comet 190P/Mueller Perihelion (2.033 AU)
Apr 08 - Asteroid 3635 Kreutz Closest Approach To Earth (0.785 AU)
Apr 08 - Asteroid 3043 San Diego Closest Approach To Earth (1.163 AU)
Apr 08 - Asteroid 4511 Rembrandt Closest Approach To Earth (1.491 AU)
Apr 08 - Asteroid 3654 AAS Closest Approach To Earth (1.712 AU)
Apr 08 - Asteroid 1134 Kepler Closest Approach To Earth (2.511 AU)
Apr 08 - Asteroid 8564 Anomalocaris Closest Approach To Earth (2.553 AU)
Apr 08 - Royal Astronomical Society Ordinary Meeting, London, United Kingdom
Apr 08 - 45th Anniversary (1971), Wethersfield Meteorite Fall (Hit House in Connecticut)
Apr 09 - Comet 77P/Longmore At Opposition (1.349 AU)
Apr 09 - Asteroid 36800 Katarinawitt Closest Approach To Earth (1.405 AU)
Apr 09 - Asteroid 13752 Grantstokes Closest Approach To Earth (1.630 AU)
Apr 09 - Charles-Eugene Delaunay's 200th Birthday (1816)
Apr 10 - Comet 321P/SOHO Perihelion (0.046 AU)
Apr 10 - Asteroid 3173 McNaught Closest Approach To Earth (1.259 AU)
Apr 10 - Asteroid 1791 Patsayev Closest Approach To Earth (1.609 AU)
Apr 10 - John McClusky's 55th Birthday (1961)
Apr 10 - John Leslie's 250th Birthday (1766)
Apr 11 - Comet 110P/Hartley At Opposition (2.580 AU)
Apr 11 - Asteroid 1065 Amundsenia Closest Approach To Earth (1.677 AU)
Apr 11 - Asteroid 134346 Pinatubo Closest Approach To Earth (1.766 AU)
Apr 11 - Asteroid 336698 Melbourne Closest Approach To Earth (2.037 AU)
Apr 11 - Asteroid 7291 Hyakutake Closest Approach To Earth (2.849 AU)
Apr 11 - Donald Menzel's 115th Birthday (1901)
Apr 11-13 - Conference: Black Holes and Friends 2, Shanghai, China
Apr 11-14 - 32nd Space Symposium, Colorado Springs, Colorado
Apr 11-15 - Conference: Water in the Universe - From Clouds to Oceans, Noordwijk, The Netherlands
Apr 11-15 - School on the Mathematics of String Theory, Marseille, France
Apr 12 - Asteroid 1814 Bach Closest Approach To Earth (1.337 AU)
Apr 12 - Asteroid 15332 CERN Closest Approach To Earth (1.428 AU)
Apr 12 - Asteroid 3252 Johnny Closest Approach To Earth (1.607 AU)
Apr 12 - Asteroid 12485 Jenniferharris Closest Approach To Earth (1.895 AU)
Apr 12 - Yuri Ivashchenko's 55th Birthday (1961)
Apr 12 - 115th Anniversary (1901), Viscara's Discovery of the Great Comet of 1901
Apr 12 - Edward Maunder's 165th Birthday (1851)
Apr 12-15 - Conference: Water in the Universe - From Clouds to Oceans, Noordwijk, The Netherlands
Apr 13 - Asteroid 3156 Ellington Closest Approach To Earth (1.696 AU)
Apr 13 - Asteroid 20488 Pic-du-Midi Closest Approach To Earth (2.024 AU)
Apr 13 - Asteroid 5540 Smirnova Closest Approach To Earth (2.212 AU)
Apr 13 - Daniel du Toit's 145th Birthday (1871)
Apr 13 - Alexander Forbes' 145th Birthday (1871)
Apr 14 - Comet 178P/Hug-Bell At Opposition (4.224 AU)
Apr 14 - Comet 36P/Whipple At Opposition (4.243 AU)
Apr 14 - Asteroid 3763 Quianxuesen Closest Approach To Earth (1.017 AU)
Apr 14 - Asteroid 35978 Arlington Closest Approach To Earth (1.100 AU)
Apr 14 - Asteroid 6592 Goya Closest Approach To Earth (2.107 AU)
Apr 14 - 85th Anniversary (1931), Pontlyfni Meteorite Fall in Wales
Apr 15 - Asteroid 2710 Veverka Closest Approach To Earth (1.134 AU)
Apr 15 - Asteroid 2244 Tesla Closest Approach To Earth (2.289 AU)
Apr 15 - Asteroid 1691 Oort Closest Approach To Earth (2.661 AU)
Apr 16 - Comet 237P/LINEAR At Opposition (1.433 AU)
Apr 16 - Comet 233P/La Sagra At Opposition (1.792 AU)
Apr 16 - Asteroid 4970 Druyan Closest Approach To Earth (1.673 AU)
Apr 16 - Asteroid 5649 Donnashirley Closest Approach To Earth (1.861 AU)
Apr 16 - Asteroid 10806 Mexico Closest Approach To Earth (1.880 AU)
Apr 16 - Asteroid 7273 Garyhuss Closest Approach To Earth (2.184 AU)
Apr 16 - Asteroid 767 Bondia Closest Approach To Earth (2.545 AU)
Apr 16 - David Brown's 60th Birthday (1956)
Apr 17 - Asteroid 5020 Asimov Closest Approach To Earth (1.367 AU)
Apr 17 - Asteroid 1640 Nemo Closest Approach To Earth (1.864 AU)
Apr 17 - Harold Johnson's 95th Birthday (1921)
Apr 18 - Mercury At Its Greatest Eastern Elongation (20 Degrees)
Apr 18 - Asteroid 5841 Stone Closest Approach To Earth (1.183 AU)
Apr 18 - Asteroid 9781 Jubjubbird Closest Approach To Earth (1.486 AU)
Apr 18 - Asteroid 1094 Siberia Closest Approach To Earth (1.674 AU)
Apr 18 - Asteroid 51823 Rickhusband Closest Approach To Earth (2.787 AU)
Apr 18 - Michel Ory's 50th Birthday (1966)
Apr 18 - Charles Gifford's 155th Birthday (1861)
Apr 19 - Asteroid 28078 Mauricehilleman Closest Approach To Earth (1.321 AU)
Apr 19 - Asteroid 3125 Hay Closest Approach To Earth (1.482 AU)
Apr 19 - Asteroid 3673 Levy Closest Approach To Earth (1.709 AU)
Apr 19 - Asteroid 55555 DNA Closest Approach To Earth (1.733 AU)
Apr 19 - Asteroid 18725 Atacama Closest Approach To Earth (1.956 AU)
Apr 19 - Asteroid 4969 Lawrence Closest Approach To Earth (2.530 AU)
Apr 19 - 15th Anniversary (2001), STS-100 Launch (Space Shuttle Endeavour, International Space Station)
Apr 19 - 45th Anniversary (1971), Salyut 1 Launch (1st Space Station)
Apr 19 - Brett Gladman's 50th Birthday (1966)
Apr 19-24 - 26th International Conference Radioelektronika, Kosice, Slovakia
Apr 20 - Asteroid 4148 McCartney Closest Approach To Earth (1.052 AU)
Apr 20 - Asteroid 12790 Cernan Closest Approach To Earth (1.220 AU)
Apr 20 - Asteroid 3783 Morris Closest Approach To Earth (1.390 AU)
Apr 20 - Asteroid 8208 Volta Closest Approach To Earth (1.692 AU)
Apr 20 - Asteroid 6111 Davemckay Closest Approach To Earth (1.912 AU)
Apr 20 - Asteroid 6677 Renoir Closest Approach To Earth (2.456 AU)
Apr 20 - Asteroid 1006 Lagrangea Closest Approach To Earth (3.267 AU)
Apr 21 - Asteroid 8992 Magnanimity Closest Approach To Earth (1.526 AU)
Apr 21 - Asteroid 17640 Mount Stromlo Closest Approach To Earth (2.236 AU)
Apr 21 - Michael Freedman's 65th Birthday (1951)
Apr 21 - 85th Anniversary (1931), 1st Rocket Mail Launch by Friedrich Schmiedl
Apr 21 - Richard Lines' 100th Birthday (1916)
Apr 22 - Earth Day
Apr 22 - Cassini, Orbital Trim Maneuver #447 (OTM-447)
Apr 22 - Lyrids Meteor Shower Peak
Apr 22 - Venus Passes 0.9 Degrees from Uranus
Apr 22 - Asteroid 21619 Johnhopkins Closest Approach To Earth (1.227 AU)
Apr 22 - Asteroid 4416 Ramses Closest Approach To Earth (1.496 AU)
Apr 22 - Asteroid 9997 COBE Closest Approach To Earth (1.772 AU)
Apr 22 - Harold Jeffreys' 125th Birthday (1891)
Apr 23 - Intelsat 31 Proton-M Briz-M P4 Launch
Apr 23 - Asteroid 218998 Navi Closest Approach To Earth (1.237 AU)
Apr 23 - Asteroid 8444 Popovich Closest Approach To Earth (1.589 AU)
Apr 23 - Asteroid 128 Nemesis Closest Approach To Earth (2.087 AU)
Apr 24 - Asteroid 48300 Kronk Closest Approach To Earth (1.951 AU)
Apr 24 - Asteroid 1539 Borrelly Closest Approach To Earth (2.736 AU)
Apr 24 - Asteroid 1941 Wild Closest Approach To Earth (3.874 AU)
Apr 24 - Stephen Synnott's 70th Birthday (1946)
Apr 25 - Comet 169P/NEAT At Opposition (3.600 AU)
Apr 25 - Asteroid 316020 Linshuhow Closest Approach To Earth (1.017 AU)
Apr 25 - Asteroid 763 Cupido Closest Approach To Earth (1.594 AU)
Apr 25 - Asteroid 11356 Chuckjones Closest Approach To Earth (2.380 AU)
Apr 25-28 - Workshop: What Shapes Galaxies?, Baltimore, Maryland
Apr 26 - Asteroid 6735 Madhatter Closest Approach To Earth (1.286 AU)
Apr 26 - Asteroid 5223 McSween Closest Approach To Earth (2.662 AU)
Apr 26 - Asteroid 1268 Libya Closest Approach To Earth (3.053 AU)
Apr 27 - Comet 268P/Bernardi At Opposition (2.553 AU)
Apr 27 - Asteroid 14965 Bonk Closest Approach To Earth (1.032 AU)
Apr 27 - Asteroid 136 Austria Closest Approach To Earth (1.319 AU)
Apr 27 - Asteroid 12820 Robinwilliams Closest Approach To Earth (2.055 AU)
Apr 27 - Asteroid 2161 Grissom Closest Approach To Earth (2.165 AU)
Apr 28 - Asteriod 5553 Chodas Closest Approach To Earth (1.383 AU)
Apr 28 - Asteroid 804 Hispania Closest Approach To Earth (1.993 AU)
Apr 28 - 25th Anniversary (1991), STS-39 Launch (Space Shuttle Discovery, DOD)
Apr 28 - Bart Bok's 110th Birthday (1906)
Apr 29 - Asteroid 10797 Guatemala Closest Approach To Earth (1.026 AU)
Apr 29 - Asteroid 7041 Nantucket Closest Approach To Earth (1.485 AU)
Apr 29 - Asteroid 22739 Sikhote-Alin Closest Approach To Earth (1.777 AU)
Apr 29 - Asteroid 19631 Greensleeves Closest Approach To Earth (2.250 AU)
Apr 29 - Aleksander Wolszczan's 70th Birthday (1946)
Apr 29-May 01 -[Nov 17] Workshop for Science Teachers: Astronomy from the Ground Up!, near Parkes, Australia
Apr 30 -[Nov 16] Aleph 1 CZ-3B Launch
Apr 30 - Comet 322P/SOHO At Opposition (2.416 AU)
Apr 30 - Asteroid 5256 Farquhar Closest Approach To Earth (1.500 AU)
Apr 30 - Asteroid 6227 Alanrubin Closest Approach To Earth (1.963 AU)
Apr 30 - Asteroid 30441 Curly Closest Approach To Earth (2.256 AU)
Apr 30 - 1010th Anniversary (1006 AD), Appearance of Supernova 1006
-------------------------------------
Wishing you clearest skies and brightest comets.....
Dr. Clay
Arkansas Sky Observatories
10 Observatory Hill Drive, Petit Jean Mt.
MPC/cbat Obs. H41 / Petit Jean Mountain
MPC/cbat Obs. H45 / Petit Jean Mountain South
MPC/cbat Obs. H43 / Conway
MPC/cbat Obs. H44 / Cascade Mountain
http://www.arksky.org/
     
Go To Top